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Date Submitted Fri. Oct. 11th, 2013 10:38 AM
Revision 1
Syntax Master claireling
Tags cable | duplex | fiber | optic | Simplex
Comments 0 comments
With the exponential growth in communications, caused largely by the wide acceptance of the Internet, many carriers have found their estimates of fiber needs have been highly underestimated. Although most cables included many spare fibers when installed, this growth has used many of them and new capacity is required. Make use of a number of ways to improve this problem, eventually the WDM has shown more cost effective in most cases.

WDM Definition:

Wave Division Multiplexing (WDM) enables multiple data streams of varying wavelengths ("colors") to become combined right into a single fiber, significantly enhancing the overall capacity from the fiber. WDM can be used in applications where considerable amounts of traffic are needed over long distance in carrier networks. There's two types of WDM architectures: Course Wave Division Multiplexing (CWDM) and Dense Wave Division Multiplexing (DWDM).

WDM System Development History:

A WDM system uses a multiplexer in the transmitter to become listed on the signals together, and a demultiplexer at the receiver to separate them apart. With the right type of fiber it is possible to have a device that does both simultaneously, and can work as an optical add-drop multiplexer. The optical filtering devices used have conventionally been etalons (stable solid-state single-frequency Fabry¡°žCP¡°ž|rot interferometers by means of thin-film-coated optical glass).

The idea was first published in 1980, and by 1978 WDM systems appeared to be realized in the laboratory. The first WDM systems combined 3 signals. Modern systems are designed for as much as 160 signals and can thus expand a fundamental 10 Gbit/s system over a single fiber pair to in excess of 1.6 Tbit/s.

WDM systems are well-liked by telecommunications companies because they allow them to expand the capacity of the network without laying more fiber. By utilizing WDM and optical amplifiers, they can accommodate several generations of technology rise in their optical infrastructure without needing to overhaul the backbone network. Capacity of a given link can be expanded by simply upgrades towards the multiplexers and demultiplexers at each end.

This is often made by use of optical-to-electrical-to-optical (O/E/O) translation in the very edge of the transport network, thus permitting interoperation with existing equipment with optical interfaces.

WDM System Technology:

Most WDM systems operate on single-mode fiber optical cables, which have a core diameter of 9 µm. Certain forms of WDM may also be used in multi-mode fiber cables (also referred to as premises cables) which have core diameters of fifty or 62.5 µm.

Early WDM systems were expensive and complicated to operate. However, recent standardization and better understanding of the dynamics of WDM systems make WDM less expensive to deploy.

Optical receivers, as opposed to laser sources, tend to be wideband devices. Therefore the demultiplexer must provide the wavelength selectivity of the receiver in the WDM system.

WDM systems are split into different wavelength patterns, conventional/coarse (CWDM) and dense (DWDM). Conventional WDM systems provide up to 8 channels within the 3rd transmission window (C-Band) of silica fibers around 1550 nm. Dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) uses the same transmission window but with denser channel spacing. Channel plans vary, but a typical system would use 40 channels at 100 GHz spacing or 80 channels with 50 GHz spacing. Some technologies are capable of 12.5 GHz spacing (sometimes called ultra dense WDM). Such spacings are today only achieved by free-space optics technology. New amplification options (Raman amplification) enable the extension of the usable wavelengths towards the L-band, pretty much doubling these numbers.

Coarse wavelength division multiplexing (CWDM) in contrast to conventional WDM and DWDM uses increased channel spacing to allow less sophisticated and thus cheaper transceiver designs. To supply 8 channels on one fiber CWDM uses the whole frequency band between second and third transmission window (1310/1550 nm respectively) including both windows (minimum dispersion window and minimum attenuation window) but the critical area where OH scattering may occur, recommending using OH-free silica fibers in case the wavelengths between second and third transmission window ought to be used. Avoiding this region, the channels 47, 49, 51, 53, 55, 57, 59, 61 remain and these are the most commonly used.Each WDM Optical MUX includes its optical insertion loss and isolation measures of every branch. WDMs are available in several fiber sizes and kinds (250µm fiber, loose tube, 900µm buffer, Ø 3mm cable,simplex fiber optic cable or duplex fiber cable).

WDM, DWDM and CWDM are based on the same idea of using multiple wavelengths of sunshine on one fiber, but differ within the spacing of the wavelengths, quantity of channels, and also the capability to amplify the multiplexed signals within the optical space. EDFA provide an efficient wideband amplification for that C-band, Raman amplification adds a mechanism for amplification in the L-band. For CWDM wideband optical amplification is not available, limiting the optical spans to many tens of kilometres.

Regardless if you are WDM Optical MUX expert or it is your first experience with optical networking technologies, FiberStore products and services are equipped for simplicity of use and operation across all applications. If you want to choose some fiber optic cable to connect the WDM, you are able to make reference to our fiber optic cable specifications.Have any questions, pls contact us.
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Date Submitted Fri. Sep. 20th, 2013 10:31 AM
Revision 1
Syntax Master claireling
Tags cable | fiber | multimode | OM3 | optic | Simplex
Comments 0 comments
Duplex Fiber Cable

Duplex fiber cable is designed for general fiber patch cord production where consistency and uniformity are vital for fast, efficient terminations. We have the right duplex fiber cable in many different outside diameter (OD) sizes and meet all tooling and termination requirements.Duplex Fiber Optic Cables consist of two fibers joined by a thin connection between the two jackets. Workstations, fiber switches and servers, fiber optic modems, and similar hardware require duplex cable. They are used in applications where data needs to be transferred bi-directionally. One fiber transmits data one direction; the other fiber transmits data in the opposite direction. Duplex fiber optic cables from FiberStore can be available in single-mode and multimode.

Multimode vs Singlemode Fiber

A "mode" in Fiber Optic cable refers to the path in which light travels. Multimode cables have a larger core diameter than that of singlemode cables. This larger core diameter allows multiple pathways and several wavelengths of light to be transmitted. Singlemode Duplex cables and Singlemode Simplex cables have a smaller core diameter and only allow a single wavelength and pathway for light to travel. Multimode fiber is commonly used in patch cable applications such as fiber to the desktop or patch panel to equipment. Multimode fiber is available in two sizes, 50 micron and 62.5 micron. Singlemode fiber is typically used in network connections over long lengths and is available in a core diameter of 9 microns (8.3 microns to be exact). Many types of multimode fiber optic cable (such as om3 multimode fiber) and singlemode fiber optic cable for sale in FiberStore.

How Fiber Optic Cables Work

The traditional method of data transmission over copper cables is accomplished by transmitting electrons over a copper conductor. Fiber Optic cables transmit a digital signal via pulses of light through a very thin strand of glass. Fiber strands (the core of the fiber optic cable) are extremely thin, no thicker than a human hair. The core is surrounded by a cladding which reflects the light back into the core and eliminates light from escaping the cable.

A fiber optic chain works in the following manner. At the one end, the fiber cable is connected to a transmitter. The transmitter converts electronic pulses into light pulses and sends the optical signal through the fiber cable. At the other end, the fiber cable is plugged into a receiver which decodes the optical signal back into digital pulses.

Advantages & Disadvantages of Fiber Optic Cable

There are many advantages and disadvantages in using fiber optic cable instead of copper cable. One advantage is that fiber cables support longer cable runs than copper. In addition, data is transmitted at greater speeds and higher bandwidths than over copper cables.
The major disadvantages of fiber optic cables are cost and durability. Fiber cables are more expensive than copper cables and much more delicate.

Three Steps To Pick Out A Fiber Optic Cable
So when you go to pick out a fiber optic cable, there are a few things you'll want to know. First, make sure that the type of connector you purchase matches your input connection. Second, check to see if your device prefers single or multi-mode transfer. Figure out if you need simplex fiber optic cable or duplex fiber optic cable. And finally, choose which length you need. You can discern this by setting up your system and running a string from the speaker or TV to the equipment. Always buy the next larger length rather than one that is on the small side. You won't regret it!
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Date Submitted Tue. Sep. 10th, 2013 7:15 AM
Revision 1
Syntax Master claireling
Tags cable | fiber | fibre | optic | Simplex | Suppliers
Comments 0 comments
Fiber Optic Cable:

In fiber optic cable, optical fibers carry digital data signals in the form of modulated pulses of light. This is a relatively safe way to send data because no electrical impulses are carried over the fiber optic cable. This means that fiber-optic cable cannot be tapped and the data stolen, which is possible with any copper-based cable carrying data in the form of electronic signals.

Fiber optic cable is good for very high-speed, high-capacity data transmission because of the lack of attenuation and the purity of the signal.

A fiber optic cable can transmit information at very high speed over a very great distance. It comprises one or more optical fibers enveloped in a thermoplastic sheath for mechanical protection.

Fiber Optic Composition:

Optical fibers consist of an extremely thin cylinder of glass, called the core, surrounded by a concentric layer of glass, known as the cladding. The fibers are sometimes made of plastic. Plastic is easier to install, but cannot carry the light pulses as far as glass.

Each glass strand passes signals in only one direction. So a cable consists of two strands in separate jackets. One strand transmits and one receives. A reinforcing layer of plastic surrounds each glass strand while kevlar fibers provide strength.

Fiber Optic Technologies

Data transmission via fiber optic cable uses a laser beam, offering very little loss over great distances. The core fiber has a higher refractive index than its cladding material, keeping the light within by avoiding multiple reflection (single-mode fiber), thus acting as a wave guide.

Fiber Optic Cable Types:

Now,many fiber optic cable suppliers provide a wide range of quality optical fiber cables with detailed fiber optic cable specifications displayed for your convenience selecting.Many types of fiber optic cable including about 250um bare fiber,tight buffer,large core glass,simplex fiber optic cable,duplex fiber cable,OM3 OM4, Indoor Outdoor cable,loose tube,breakout cable,ribbon cable,LSZH cable,armored cable,ftth cable,figure 8 aerial cable,plastic cable,hybrid and composite cable,adss cable,special cable and so on.

How to Choose Fiber Optic Cable?

Fiber optic cables are preferable to electrical cables over long transmission distances or when an electromagnetic disturbance in an industrial setting might interfere with the signal. Single-mode fibers are required for high-speed, long-distance transmission, while multi-mode fibers are suitable for low speeds and short distances.

Optical fibers have found a widespread use in optical technologies. Today is electronical high-tech applications as for example the Laser Scanning Microscopy, the sensor technology, machine vision, medical laser or military technology use flexible elements in form of optical fibers for light transfer frequently. In most cases, very special requirements to design and function of optical fiber cables are put. We realize custom-made solutions regarding the design of fiber connectors and wavelength, transceiver sale mode behavior, polarization and beam profile.This enables short decisions and high flexibility in the creation of single components as well as system solutions. FiberStore wide-ranging competence is a substantial advantage in the realization of custom solutions. Want to know more customized to fiber optic products(such as 10g fiber cable). FiberStore can supply this service.
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Date Submitted Mon. Jul. 29th, 2013 4:18 AM
Revision 1
Syntax Master claireling
Tags cable | duplex | fiber | optic | Simplex
Comments 0 comments
Fiber Optical Cable has brought a revolution to the data transmission system. As the earlier Electrical Wire System was difficult to manage and was sometimes also hazardous to life. With the emergence of Fiber Optical Cable, data transmission is no more an irksome job. It is now simplified, providing much more convenient than ever imagined.

Following Are The Reasons For Choosing Optical Cables For Network Cabling:

Safe To Use: Fiber Cable is far better than copper cable from the safety point of view. Copper and Aluminum Wire are good conductors of electricity and carry electric current. But when their outer insulated coating gets damaged, one can experience electric shock that can be dangerous to life. In this regard, Fiber Cables are safer to use because they do not transmit current but rather light waves.

Withstand Rough Conditions: Fiber Cable is capable of resisting tough conditions that co-axial or any other such cable cannot do. The reason is that other cables are usually made up of one or the other metal and are prone to corrosion, while Fiber Cable is covered with protective plastic coating with glass inside and transmits light impulses in spite of electric current, which make it resistant towards corrosion.

Long Distance Data Transmission: There cannot be any comparison in terms of data carrying capacity of Fiber Optical Cable and Copper Cable. Fiber Cable can transmit signals 50 times longer than Copper Cable.

Moreover, signal loss rate of Fiber Optical Wire is also very less, and thus does not need any kind of reminder in transmitting the signals at same pace. Fiber Cable has higher bandwidth that is amount of data communication resources available or consumed ®C this is the reason how Fiber Cable can transmit data at longer distances.

Easy Installation: Ethernet Cable is long and thin with intact cables inside. It is also light in weight which makes its installation at almost every place easier as compared to other wires.

No Electrical Interference: Fiber Optical Cable neither carries electric current nor need earthing. Therefore, it does not get affected by the electrical interferences. Fiber Cable is immune to moisture and lighting, which makes it ideal to be fitted inside the soil or an area where there is high Electromagnetic Interference (EMI).

Durable and Long Lasting: Fiber Optical Cable is durable and lasts longer than any other cable such as Co-Axial Cable, Copper Cable, etc. It is perfect for network cabling.

Data Security: Extra security can be provided with Fiber Optical Cable as it can be tapped easily and data transmitted through it remains secure, while in case of the Copper Cable there is no surety of data security and any loss of data cannot be obtained back.

There are various types of optical fiber cables available on the market, including 250um Bare Fiber, 900um Tight Buffer Fiber, Large Core Glass Fiber, Simplex Fiber Optic Cable, Duplex Fiber Cable, OM4 OM3 10G Fiber Cable, Indoor Distribution Cable, Indoor & Outdoor Cable, Outdoor Loose Tube Cable, Fiber Breakout Cable, Ribbon Fiber Cable, LSZH Fiber Optic Cable, Armored Fiber Optic Cable, FTTH Fiber Optic Cable, Figure 8 Aerial Cable, Plastic Optical Fiber, Polarization Maintaining Fiber & Special Fiber, etc. They are used for different applications, one must do a thorough research before buying fiber cables for network cabling.
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Date Submitted Fri. Jul. 5th, 2013 3:11 AM
Revision 1
Syntax Master claireling
Tags cable | fiber | multimode | optic | Simplex
Comments 0 comments
Fiber optic cable is favored for today's high-speed data communications because it eliminates the problems of twisted-pair cable, such as near-end crosstalk (NEXT), electromagnetic interference (EMI), and security breaches. Fibre Optic Cable is the preferred option in the interconnecting links between floors or buildings, is the backbone of any structured cabling solution. While, making the right decisions when it comes to Data Network cabling is difficult as it can make a huge difference in the ability of your network to reliably support current and future requirements. There are many factors to consider and today I will guide you through the many options available and find the best one suits your application.

1. Multimode Fiber Cable Or Single-mode Fiber Cable

There are two basic types of fiber: mulitimode and single-mode. Both types consist of two basic components: the core and the cladding which traps the light in the core.

Multimode fiber cable

Multimode fiber, as the name suggests, permits the signal to travel in multiple modes, or pathways, along the inside of the glass strand or core. It is available with fiber core diameters of 62.5 and a slightly smaller 50 microns. The problem with multimode fiber optics is that long cable runs in multiple paths may lead to signal distortion. This can result in incomplete and unclear data transmission.

Applications covering short distances can use multimode fiber optic network cable. Ideal uses for such kinds of cables are within data center connections. Multimode cables are economical choices for such applications. There are various performance levels within the multimode fiber optic cable such as OM3 cable for distances within 300 m, OM4 cable supports Gigabit Ethernet distances within 550m and 10G applications.

Single-mode fiber cable

Single-mode fiber cables offer a higher transmission rate. These cables contain a tiny core that measures about five to ten microns. These tiny cores have the capacity to eliminate distortion and produce the highest transmission speeds. Single-mode fiber generally has a core that is 8.3 microns in diameter. Singlemode fiber requires laser technology for sending and receiving data. Although a laser is used, light in a single-mode fiber also refracts off the fiber cladding. The presence of high intensity lasers helps transfer data across large distances. Singlemode has the ability to carry a signal for miles.

Single mode is used for long haul or extreme bandwidth applications, gives you a higher transmission rate and up to 50 times more distance than multimode, but it also costs more. The small core and its single lightwave virtually eliminate any distortion that could result from overlapping light pulses, providing the least signal attenuation and highest transmission speeds of any fiber cable type.

The best choice to choose multimode optical cable when the transmission distance is less than 2km. In the other sides, use single-mode optical cable when the transmission is more than 2km. Although the core sizes of multimode and singlemode fiber differ, after the cladding and another layer for durability are applied, both fiber types end up with an outer diameter of about 250 microns. This makes it both more robust and easier to work with.

2. Indoor Cable Or Outdoor Cable

The major difference between indoor and outdoor cables is water blocking. Any conduit is someday likely to get moisture in it. Outdoor cables are designed to protect the fibers from years of exposure to moisture.

Indoor Cables

Indoor cables are what we call "tight-buffered" cables, where the glass fiber has a primary coating and secondary buffer coatings that enlarge each fiber to 900 microns°™about 1mm or 1/25-inch°™to make the fiber easier to work with. Indoor cables are flexible, and tough, containing multiple Tight Buffered or Unit Cord fibers.

Types Of Indoor cables available

Simplex and Zip Cord: Simplex Fiber Optic Cables are one fiber, tight-buffered (coated with a 900 micron buffer over the primary buffer coating) with Kevlar (aramid fiber) strength members and jacketed for indoor use. The jacket is usually 3mm (1/8 in.) diameter. Zipcord is simply two of these joined with a thin web. It's used mostly for patch cord and backplane applications, but zipcord can also be used for desktop connections. They are commonly used in patch cord and backplane applications. Additionally, they can be utilized for desktop connections. These cables only have one fiber and are generally used indoors.

Distribution cables: They contain several tight-buffered fibers bundled under the same jacket with Kevlar strength members and sometimes fiberglass rod reinforcement to stiffen the cable and prevent kinking. These cables are small in size, and used for short, dry conduit runs, riser and plenum applications. The fibers are double buffered and can be directly terminated, but because their fibers are not individually reinforced, these cables need to be broken out with a "breakout box" or terminated inside a patch panel or junction box. The distribution cable is smaller and used in dry and short conduit runs, plenum and riser applications, is the most popular cable for indoor use.

Breakout cables: They are made of several simplex cables bundled together inside a common jacket for convenience in pulling and ruggedness. This is a strong, rugged design, but is larger and more expensive than the distribution cables. It is suitable for conduit runs, riser and plenum applications, is ideal for industrial applications where ruggedness is important or in a location where only one or two pieces of equipment (such as local hubs) need to be connected.

Outdoor Cables

Optical fiber in outdoor applications requires more protection from water ingress, vermin, and other conditions encountered underground. Outdoor cables also need increased strength for greater pulling distances. Buyers should know the potential hazards that the cables will face, for example, if the cables will be exposed to chemicals or extreme temperatures.

Loose Tube cables: These cables are composed of several fibers together inside a small plastic tube, which are in turn wound around a central strength member and jacketed, providing a small, high fiber count cable. This type of cable is ideal for outside plant trunking applications, as it can be made with loose tubes filled with gel or water absorbent powder to prevent harm to the fibers from water. Since the fibers have only a thin buffer coating, they must be carefully handled and protected to prevent damage. It can be used in conduits, strung overhead or buried directly into the ground.

Ribbon Cable: This cable offers the highest packing density, since all the fibers are laid out in rows, typically of 12 fibers, and laid on top of each other. This way 144 fibers only has a cross section of about 1/4 inch or 6mm! Some cable designs use a "slotted core" with up to 6 of these 144 fiber ribbon assemblies for 864 fibers in one cable! Since it's outside plant cable, it's gel-filled for water blocking.

Armored Cable: Cable installed by direct burial in areas where rodents are a problem usually have metal armored between two jackets to prevent rodent penetration. This means the cable is conductive, so it must be grounded properly. You'd better choose armored fiber cable when use cable directly buried outdoor.

Aerial Cable: They can be lashed to a messenger or another cable (common in CATV) or have metal or aramid strength members to make them self supporting. Aerial cables are for outside installation on poles.

The table below summarizes the choices, applications and advantages of each.
Cable Type Application Advantages
Distribution Premises Small size for lots of fibers, inexpensive
Breakout Premises Rugged, easy to terminate, no hardware needed
Loose Tube Outside Plant Rugged, gel or dry water-blocking
Armored Outside Plant Prevents rodent damage
Ribbon Outside Plant Highest fiber count for small size

All cables share some common characteristics. For example, they all include various plastic coatings to protect the fiber, from the buffer coating on the fiber itself to the outside jacket. All also include some strength members for pulling the cable without harming the fibers. Outdoor fiber optic cable has moisture protection, either a gel filling or a dry powder or tape. Direct-buried cables may have a layer of metal armor to prevent damage from rodents. It is advisable that you should customize your cable to make it suitable to your application when the quantity of fiber optic cables is large and also for the cost-effective reasons.

Knowing basic information about fiber optic cables make choosing the right one for the project a lot easier. It is always beneficial to konw more about fiber optic cables.
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Date Submitted Thu. Apr. 25th, 2013 8:50 AM
Revision 1
Syntax Master claireling
Tags cable | fiber | optic | Simplex
Comments 0 comments
Simplex and duplex are with assorted cable structure types; they've some from single mode and multi mode that are linked to fiber optic glass types.From FiberStore,we provide some bulk fiber optic cables types in our store.Including Simplex Fiber Optic Cable and Duplex Fiber Optic Cable,we have other forms cables inside it.Customers have the flexibility to choose a cable plant to best fit their requirements.We are the professional fiber optic cables supplier ,and offer top quality service to suit your needs.

Simplex Fiber Optic Cable:

Simplex Fiber Optic Cables will probably be used each time a signal only needs to go in one direction. They are made for production termination where consistency and uniformity are necessary for fast and efficient operation.

Simplex Fiber Optic Cable includes a single fiber,tight-buffered (coated having a 900 micron buffer within the primary buffer coating) with Kevlar (aramid fiber) strength members and jacketed for indoor use, and is used mostly for patch cord and backplane applications. Analog to digital data readouts, interstate highway sensor relays, and automated speed and boundary sensors (for sports applications) are typical great uses of Simplex fiber optic cable. This type of fiber cable can be less than Duplex cables, because less materials are involved. Simplex Fiber Cable can be a single fiber for sale in single mode, multimode, or polarization maintaining, plus they can satisfy the strength and adaptability required for today's fiber interconnect applications. We supply Riser, Plenum rated constructions and LSZH jacket.

Duplex Fiber Optic Cable:

Duplex Fiber Optic Cables contain two fibers accompanied by a skinny link between both jackets. Either single mode or multimode,they are utilised in applications where data has to be transferred bi-directionally. One fiber transmits data one direction; another fiber transmits data inside the opposite direction. Larger workstations, switches, servers, and major networking hardware tends to require duplex fiber optic cable.

Duplex fibers types:

Half-duplex: Data may possibly be transmitted one way at a time.
Full-duplex: Information is transferred in 2 directions simultaneously.

Other duplex infomation:A duplex communication system is a point-to-point system composed of two connected parties or devices that can contact one another both in directions, simultaneously. Now, Duplex systems operate in many communications networks, to allow for a communication "two-way street" between two connected parties or to supply a "reverse path" for the monitoring and remote adjustment of equipment within the field.

Source:Overview Simplex and duplex Fiber Optic Cable